Thank you to everyone who made 2015 such a magical season at the Colorado Shakespeare Festival!

"Anderson joined the CSF in 2008 with a recommendation from award-winning fight coordinator and CSF troupe member Geoffrey Kent; the pair had worked together coordinating fight choreography and stage weapons for theater companies across the metro area. What's more, Anderson connected with local sword maker Dennis Graves, manager of Boulder-based No Quarter Arms company, who has been fabricating weapons since the 1960s. It all gave Anderson a valuable set of skills as an actor looking to find his niche."

"If I were able to watch ['Wittenberg'], I think Luther’s worldview would be the most convincing. For when you add you together design, purpose, information, meaning, and intelligence, the only logical inference is that these things—and more—point to a Designer of intelligence and purpose. In the end, nothing cannot produce something; and if my eyes serve me properly, there’s a lot of something in the world—just stroll the campus of the University of Colorado and you’ll see."

"The Denver Center for the Performing Arts said farewell to retiring Head of Acting Larry Hecht on Monday night with a celebration that drew past and current acting students from their 20s into their 70s. Hecht taught hundreds of students over 18 years at the DCPA, ranging from beginners to master’s degree candidates."

Back by popular demand, The Colorado Shakespeare Festival will offer an acting class for adults in the fall of 2015.

"This take on Othello is a tour de force from a twosome composed of an out-of-town heavyweight and a CSF legend. Macon and Kent adeptly foil one another and dish performances — that of Macon being one of brawny zeal, and Kent’s being one of coy, but ultimately self-destructive cool ­— that buoy all other names on the bill."

"The action in the Colorado Shakespeare Festival's production of 'Henry V' offers audiences an unmistakable degree of wanderlust."

"In Henry V, Bonenfant's performance steadily but gently reveals the last vestiges of his character's ambivalence. His performance captures the subtle differences betwixt good and special."

In conjunction with the annual Colorado Shakespeare Festival, the nearby Shakespeare Gardens are planted with flowers, herbs and vegetables that pertain to the season’s plays—and they’re all accomp